Future World Exhibition at the ArtScience Museum

Hey everyone!

We have been looking forward to visiting the ArtScience Museum by the Marina Bay Sands since we heard about Future World exhibition. A visual and auditory exhibition, it involves the use of technology and human input to immerse the visitors. We were especially keen of a particular installation featuring 170,000 LED lights (as seen later), so look out for that! We also visited other concurrent exhibitions, but we will write about them very soon (in a separate entry).

We had with us our trusted Fujifilm X-T10 and the Instantflex TL70 to capture our journey. Furthermore, we had also recently acquired Lomography’s Daguerrotype Achromat 2.9/64 Arts Lens, which produces soft pictures and also uses aperture plates like Lomography’s Petzval 58 Bokeh Control Arts Lens (we featured this in one of our Christmas entries not too long ago).

Future World: Where Arts Meet Science

In this exhibition, humans and technology interact in a series of environments, designed to intrigue and entertain. The installations are divided according to themes: Nature, Town, Park and Space. We describe below our encounter with the various installations:

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Nature: In this installation, projectors fix moving images on the walls, floors and ceilings. Flora and fauna illuminate the spacious room, and it feels like as if we were totally immersed in nature.

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Nature: In the next installation, a series of large screens depict our world with rising sea levels. Sandra is captured using the TL70!

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Town: In this large hall, there were interactive installations for all visitors (but notably for children) designed to illustrate the challenges of urban living and sharing common spaces. I bet however, that more children were certainly enjoying this slide!
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Town: On this interative table, the moving figures can detect items on the table as ‘obstacles’ (the TL70 in this case) and climb over them!
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Town: These lighted cubes were fun to move around, stack up and climb on!
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Park: This virtual waterfall provided a stunning backdrop for many visitors to capture their silhouettes!
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Park: Another hall features many interactive installations, such as the LED-coloured balls, and a digital aquarium whereby visitors’ drawings can be transferred from the physical to the digital!
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In the low-light environment, we had a stand to prop up the TL70. The long exposure captures the ghostly figures (of children) running around!
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Space: This was the most anticipated installation of the Future World exhibition; with over 170,000 LED lights, visitors were completely basked in flashing lights.
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The lights also changed colours intermittently, according to the background music.
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We certainly were the only people taking selfies while walking through the LED light installation!

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Outside the installation, many visitors were snapping away with their handphones.

After walking through the installation, we reached for the Daguerrotype Lens, and inserted an aperture plate of a 4-point star. Intending to capture bokeh, we certainly got more than we asked for!

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It really felt like we were in space! The black figures below belonged to the other visitors standing before us.

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This aperture plate featured a snowflake, and it was simply mesmerizing!
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Taking a close up of the LED light yielded some otherworldly, sci-fi imagery.
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Sandra taking instax photos with the TL70…
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… and this was the instax that Sandra captured! Damian moved around a bit too much…
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Even by focusing, the image is still soft in tone and appearance.

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The TL70 has a heart bokeh aperture setting; many of the LED lights are captured as heart shapes!
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Easily our favourite shot with the TL70, the silhouette gives off an ethereal vibe!

We had a lot of fun interacting with the installations at the Future World exhibition. Since it is a permanent exhibition, we can revisit the ArtScience Museum, especially if we can get aperture plates with different designs (for more creative effects using the bokeh). There is an entry fee, but it certainly is worth it!

Till next time,

Damianwithsandra

 

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