The Punggol Tree

So when we found out that a certain well known tree was going to be removed, we just knew that we would have to pay it a visit.

We chose a timing close to sunset, and we certainly (almost) did not regret our decision!

The Punggol Tree is situated at the Punggol Waterway Park, which is a good 10 minutes’ walk from Punggol MRT. Directions by foot should not be too difficult to follow (although Google Maps hilariously suggested a 4.1 km route instead); alternatively one can take bus 84 from Punggol Bus Interchange, and 3 stops later, we were there!

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Turns out we weren’t the only ‘tree enthusiasts’ saying our goodbyes (in the form of snapping photos).

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Kelong, in the Malay language, refers to a platform built with wood. The bridge is designed in a way to hark back to the old days of Singapore, where atap huts and kampungs were the norm.

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Metal supports designed and painted to look like wooden stilts.

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The Kelong Bridge, from below, situated above Punggol Waterway.

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Many visitors online have mentioned that the tall tree beside the Punggol Lone Tree is much more beautiful and picturesque (including Sandra); regardless, both trees have their own appeal!

After having trudged up the hill (which was muddy from the rain the night before, and unfortunately riddled with mosquitoes) we got a closer look at the famed Instagram tree! It is an Albizia tree originating from eastern Indonesia and was declared dead and ‘unsafe’ in the interest of the public. That obviously didn’t stop many passers-by and travellers.

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Magnificent, even at sunset.

Clearly the tree is not as abundant or magnificent as before…

…yet, the hill and the tree was situated in a way that allowed us to capture quite some scenic pictures, with the horizon looming in the background and the pale blue sky glowing, to our immense delight.

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With the help of our trusty tripod.

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If only I could go hug the tree.

After carefully making our way down the slope, we took the opportunity to try out bokeh photography, which worked quite well. Bokeh photography essentially produces out-of-focus shots, which works well especially with mutiple light sources. The glimmering lights on a nearby bridge and housing estate allowed us to test that out, to our satisfaction.

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We were thrilled that this came out even better than we expected; essentially we macro-ed on the instant film, with the backdrop of the unfocused lights creating a surreal picture. Easily our favourite picture on this trip!

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A photo of the walkway, with bokeh!

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This should be hard to miss as you make your way to Punggol Waterway Park!

UPDATE: As of 12pm on 16 December, the Punggol Lone Tree has been felled. But don’t worry, the other tree is still standing strong, and amidst the backdrop of the beautiful sky, you too can snap your Instagram-worthy pictures!

Till next time,

Damianwithsandra

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2 thoughts on “The Punggol Tree

  1. Jean

    Chocolate and coffee makes mocha .. I like. hehe.

    Well done… love the pix.. keep it coming.. :=)

    So it reminds me .. A tree that bears no fruits will be cut away.. familiar no?

    Like

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